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Sean Stephenson-dontgiveupworld

Sean Stephenson Journey From Genetic Bone Disorder To A Motivational Speaker

Born with an extremely rare genetic bone disorder known as Osteogenesis Imperfecta, he was predicted to die within 24 hours.

His bones were so brittle, even coughing could fracture his ribs.

By the time he was 18, he had fractured over 200 bones in his body. He is permanently confined to a wheelchair, and to this day is only 3 feet tall.

The Osteogenesis Imperfecta didn’t help his normal development. But he didn’t left his dreams. Now he is a psychotherapist and a motivational speaker

Have you noticed that people who have more difficulties in their life are often who put much more effort in their struggle to achieve happiness?

Sean Stephenson, is an example of this, he posses a positive attitude and encourages people to always be optimistic from the moment they get out of bed until the end of their day.

You are invited to know the history of this special character.

Sean Stephenson@dontgiveupworld

Who is Sean Stephenson? What is his story?

Sean Stephenson, was born with a disease that didn’t let him to develop normally, leaving him with only 90 inches tall and so fragile that he could have fractured a rib with a coughing fit, besides that could not walk like a normal child, and lived tormented with pain all days. People looked at him all the time.

He was born with a disease that caused him an extremely small size (90 cm high).

Except on Halloween.

In Halloween, everyone looked at him differently. His different physical appearance, due to the result of osteogenesis imperfecta, helped him to join to others, and he loved that.

But on the morning of Halloween 1988, he broke his leg after get stuck in the door frame .

His favorite day became an agony. He was hysterical until his mother asked the question that would change his life: “Is this going to be a gift or a burden?” (“Is this going to be a gift or a burden?”)

Two decades later, the man who at birth was supposed to survive only 24 hours, would be doing everything possible to turn what it seems to be an insurmountable challenge into a gift – to himself and others.

Stephenson, is a 34 year old man, and he’s a psychotherapist, speaker and motivator. His book, “Get Off Your ‘But,’” was put up for sale three years ago and ended around the same time filming a documentary pilot for A & E. He wants to graduate from a PhD in clinical hypnosis, he has the idea of run for Congress after open orphanages for disabled children and a summer camp designed to eliminate the “self-sabotage” in children.

“I embrace my life,” he said one morning from the 17th floor of Tower Oakbrook . “I have lived the life of a rock star . ”

Like any motivational speaker who has taken the microphone, Stephenson has similar occurrences in all his conversations.

” Self- sabotage is the biggest problem on the planet .” ” If someone tells you you don’t, you’re talking to the wrong person.” ” To compare ourselves with others, leads to despair ” and ” fairness is an illusion “, are his favorite thoughts.

He also talk about the ” connection ” which he defined as “a change of our humanity ” is very different from the communication , the simple exchange of information. Understanding the differences may be one of the most powerful tool in changing the lives of people .

The inspiring story of Sean Stephenson.

Considering where it comes from, is hard to say goodbye Stephenson in bookstores, and at business seminars even if they are online.

Born in Chicago and raised in La Grange, Stephenson has suffered more than 200 bone fractures from the time he was 18 . His genetic disorder , which also prevents his growth , left him with such short arms that can not get the top of his head .

” You lose your ego very quickly,” said Stephenson , who weighs about 47 kilos and who is one of about 50,000 people in the U.S. with some form of osteogenesis imperfecta. “There were things that I was very uncomfortable. ”

For vehicles traveling in a child seat. He needs a cane to push the elevator buttons . His father often loads him everywhere. And when he don’t use his wheelchair, he must slide along the ground ” like a penguin ,” he said .

He always gives the credit to his parents, Gregg and Gloria Stephenson , who live with him in Oak Brook, and his sister, Heidi , when they questioned him about the development of his inner strength . After that fateful Halloween lesson , the physical daily support they give to their child, the Stephenson highlights some basics concepts : They teached him to focus on what he can do and discard what he can do. They used an hourglass to contain his lapses of self-pity to 15 minutes a day. During his frequent bouts of pain , they asked him to visualize peasant memories.

And they refused to hide him from others.

” You decide to confront this,” Mom said .

His father said: “We try to instill many positive things in his life, he took them and understood that it comes down to everything you do with what you have . ”

Stephenson soon found that sharing his vulnerability, helps people open up to him. He realized that he could use this, to help and became a motivational speaker at age 17 , although he served as spokesman for osteogenesis imperfecta since he was 11 years old.

With a specialization in political science from DePaul University , Stephenson worked as an intern for the President Bill Clinton – there’s a video of this in the website of Stephenson – and for the Rep. William O. Lipinski before graduating with honors in 2001.

Working as a motivational speaker, Stephenson was approached by people who wanted to share their personal problems with the hope that he could give them an answer . That led him to achieve a degree in psychotherapy and practice ” breakthrough therapy ” in which Stephenson gives an intense session of 12 hours to transform a person’s life .

“Being a 90 cm man in height and be in a wheelchair is about 2 percent of what I am . I am more than capable . I’m playing in the big.”

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